<  1/6  >
 

<  2/6  >
 

<  3/6  >
 

<  4/6  >
 

<  5/6  >
 

<  6/6  >
 



"You Are Nothing But A Relic From A Deleted Timeline" T-3000
& "Electronic Narcosis (v2+)"

Part of S.W.I.M, a group show about 'Net Art' at In De Ruimte 2-4 Okt 2015.
Curated by Bjorn Van Der Borght.
Link to the Facebook

ENG
Some months ago, a t-shirt caught my eye at H&M. Emblazoned on it was a text about pleasure, music, and (im)permanence: ‘Even if it’s a momentary pleasure I want to feel that music is forever.’ The text is ‘cut out’ of a colour gradient background. Both the phrase and the gradient fit perfectly into the current trend of ‘flat design’. As such, this H&M product is effectively a cut-out of current times. Bought for a song, it’s intended to be worn for one season and then chucked away. I had to have the t-shirt, not to wear, but to admire as one would an artwork. It came to occupy a space on the wall of my walk-in closet.

More recently, I was asked to participate in the ‘net art’ exhibition S*W*I*M by Bjorn Van Der Borght, its curator. Ruminating on the topic of the exhibition, also known as ‘postinternet’ art, I quickly came upon the idea of using the t-shirt as the basis for my contribution.

The throw-away mentality embodied by the H&M shirt can also be found in technology – in IT and electronics especially. Today, electronic objects often come with a certain promise that inevitably goes unkept. Their lifespan is so limited that they are practically disposable products. And yet we have the instinct to hold on to such unusable technology long after its final use. We might save a specific kind of cable that we think could come in handy one day, an old mobile phone, CDs from the nineties that are probably no longer readable, etc. We all have a box of ‘cable spaghetti’ somewhere, a receptacle to hold technology which not long ago represented the future, but which has now become hopelessly obsolete.

Setting up for the exhibition, my own box of technological spaghetti – in addition to being a sculpture or ‘readymade’ in itself – became the perfect frame in which to present another work of mine, Electronic Narcosis. This work is a 7” digital photo frame, the ideal symbol of this mentality of disposability. The work also plays with ‘sloganism’, a strategy also used in the design of the H&M shirt. My earlier explanation of that specific work: The bourgeois photo frame appears to have been updated. It is no longer a static print; it has become a moving, light-emitting digital object. But the frame in this work doesn’t show a cute baby or wedding pictures. Rather, it mimics the kind of internet slogans we are familiar with from cheap advertising and ‘clickbait’ websites. Slogans that promise us quick gratification, a change in our everyday experience or our lives in general. This work is not interactive – there is no clicking involved – so we don’t get caught by our urge to do so. Yet we are still being seduced. The presentation, the new technology, the movement, the colours, the slogans, the cute format of the screen and, of course, the light. It all adds up to the ‘electronic narcosis’ of the title; we all became prey to it and yet we seem content with this role.

On the same topic – the digital screen as a narcotic – I presented a photo depicting my hands hovering over the keyboard of a laptop. It shows an angle of ourselves that we don’t often focus on, our attention usually being focused towards the content on the screen. I wonder whether the content of the screen is even relevant. Perhaps we are simply drawn to the light, like mosquitoes. I wanted to use this work as an aesthetic counterpoint to the rest, as a knowing wink to traditionalists. A nice little photo work, printed on Dibond, ‘just like it should be’.

ADDENDUM: During the exhibition, Pieter Vermeulen (curator & friend) noted the similarities between the H&M shirt and the work of Ed Ruscha. Having looked into this, I discovered there is no connection between Ruscha and the shirt’s design. It appears to be just a shameless copy on the part of H&M. Maybe this familiarity accounts in part for my unplaceable attraction to the image.

Well, that's it for now. Thank you for reading.

(Text written by Matthias, translated by Jonathan William Beaton.)



NL
Een tijd geleden, in de H&M, viel mijn oog op een t-shirt. Daarop staat een tekst te lezen die gaat over genot, tijdelijkheid / eeuwigheid en muziek. "Even if it's a momentary pleasure I want to feel that music is forever". De tekst is een uitsnede op een gekleurde gradiënt. Beide elementen, de slogan en de gradiënt, passen perfect in de hedendaagse 'flat-design' trend. Op die manier is dit H&M product een uitsnede van deze tijd. Je koopt het voor een prikje, draagt het slechts een seizoen en weg ermee. Dit wou ik bezitten, niet om als t-shirt te gebruiken, maar louter om te bewonderen - zoals een kunstwerk. Zo kwam de t-shirt terecht aan de muur van m'n "walking closet".

Bjorn (de curator van de S*W*I*M) vroeg me deel te nemen aan zijn 'Net Art' expositie.
Verder denkend over dit thema, ook wel "post-internet" genaamd, kwam ik snel op het idee om het T-shirt te gebruiken als basis. De tijdelijkheid vervat in de H&M logica is iets da je ook terug vind in technologie en zeker in informatica en electronica.
Deze elektronische objecten bevatten een bepaalde belofte die al snel verloren gaat. Hun levensduur is zodanig beperkt dat je onvermijdelijk kan spreken over wegwerp producten. Toch hebben we de reflex deze onbruikbare technologie bij te houden. Een bepaalde kabel die we denken ooit nog te zullen gebruiken, een oude gsm, CD's van de jaren 90 die hoogst waarschijnlijk niet meer leesbaar zijn, etc… Zo hebben we allemaal wel ergens "De Doos met Kabels", de vergaarbak voor technologie die niet zo lang geleden misschien wel de belichaming van de toekomst waren, maar nu al hopeloos verouderd en onbruikbaar zijn geworden.

Deze doos werd tijdens de opstelling naast een sculptuur of ready made ook de uitgelezen plaats om een ander werk "Electronic Narcosis" in te presenteren. Dit bestaat uit een 7" fotoframe. De ideale belichaming van deze wegwerp logica. Het werk zelf speelt dan weer met het sloganeske. Een strategie die ook terug komt in de H&M shirt. "The bourgeois photo frame appears to have been updated. It is no longer a static print; it has become a moving, light-emitting digital object. But the frame in this work doesn’t show a cute baby or wedding pictures. Rather, it mimics the kind of internet slogans we are familiar with from cheap advertising and ‘clickbait’ websites. Slogans that promise us quick gratification, a change in our everyday experience or our lives in general. This work is not interactive – there is no clicking involved – so we don’t get caught by our urge to do so. Yet we are still being seduced. The presentation, the new technology, the movement, the colours, the slogans, the cute format of the screen and, of course, the light. It all adds up to the ‘electronic narcosis’ of the title; we all became prey to it and yet we seem content with this role."

Terugkerend op het thema van de verdoving van het digitale scherm presenteerde ik ook een foto waarop mijn handen en laptop te zien zijn. Een beeld, een houding van onszelf die ons niet onmiddellijk opvalt omdat onze focus op de inhoud van het scherm is gericht. Hierbij stel ik me de vraag of de inhoud van dat scherm wel relevant is. Misschien zijn we, zoals muggen, gewoonweg aangetrokken tot het licht. Dit werk wou ik gebruiken als tegengewicht. Als een klassieke versie op deze thema's. Een mooi foto werkje - een kunstwerkje, geprint op dibond, zoals dat hoort.

EXTRA: tijdens de tentoonstelling duidde Pieter Vermeulen (vriend & curator) op de gelijkenissen van de H&M shirt met het werk van Ed Ruscha. Na wat opzoeking werk is er geen verband tussen de twee. Wellicht is het een onbeschaamde kopie van H&M. Misschien werd ik ook daarom onbewust aangetrokken tot het beeld?

Zo, tot hier het verhaal. Bedankt voor het lezen.

(Tekst geschreven door Matthias)